About Mott Hall

Admissions Policy
MOTT HALL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY 2013-2014

 

Eligibility for Admission:
Each borough in New York City is divided into specific geographical zones that span a number of city blocks, with one public school in the area assigned to each zone. If a student resides within the designated zone of the school that is assigned that zone, priority for admission to the school is given to that student, provided there is sufficient space and proper documentation is provided.

In addition, the boroughs are divided into larger geographical areas called districts. The Bronx is divided into districts 7-12 and Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy is part of district 9. Any student within district 9 and 10 and in the vicinity of the school is eligible for admission, provided there is available space after zone student enrollment and proper documentation.

Applying outside of District 9 or 10:
At the end of 5th grade, students are able to apply to any New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) public school. NYCDOE publishes up to date Middle School Directories which are available at public elementary schools, middle school fairs, enrollment offices and on the Department of Education website. If a student from another zone wishes to enroll in Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy, they must directly contact our main office at 718-293-4017.

Students with Special Needs:
Students who have Individual Education Plans (IEPs) are eligible for admission to our school, provided they meet the above stated requirements.

For more information on the New York City Department of Education policy for admissions for public schools, please visit:

http://schools.nyc.gov/ChoicesEnrollment/Middle/

Assessment Policy
MOTT HALL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY | 2013-2014

                Assessment Philosophy:
Assessment at Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy is the process in which students and teachers monitor the academic growth of classes through the collection, analyzation, interpretation and reporting of data. Data generated from assessments informs planning, learning and teaching in every class. Through formative assessments, teachers establish checkpoints for students to measure daily growth. Summative assessments are criterion-based that are aligned with IB levels of achievement and state levels and percentages. All assessments are aimed to clearly communicate expectations and next steps for students to all content teachers, parents/guardians and administrators.

Standards:
The standards used to drive our assessments are aligned with New York State Common Core Learning Standards and the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program objectives. Instructors have aligned these standards to show parallels between the two and how these standards work side by side.

Assessment Methods:
Summative assessments are created to address the content and skills stated in the subject’s unit planner. Each unit is required to have one or more of the following summative assessments:

  • Performance/Project Based Assessments: An authentic project that focuses on specific Common Core Learning Standards and requires the exhibition of knowledge and inquiry in each content area.
  • Unit Test/Exams: Assessments that focus on a student’s knowledge of content, use of skills and ability to interact with problems or texts specific to the unit of study.


Formative assessments are created to track a student’s progress towards mastery of a standard. These assessments are used on a daily basis to inform instruction and re-teach plans. One or more of the following formative assessments can be used:

  • Periodic Assessment: A comprehensive examination modeled after the New York State exam that contains a combination of multiple choice, short response and extended response questions that assesses a student’s mastery of all Common Core Learning Standards.
  • Entry Slips: Questions presented at the beginning of each lesson that creates an entry point for discussion to make a connection to previous lessons or future lessons.
  • Exit/Reflection Slips: A reflective task that requires students to exhibit what they have learned in the lesson, what they still do not understand, or what connections they can make to other lessons.
  • Short Response: A written task which asks a student to present a claim and use relevant and specific evidence to develop and support their claim in a paragraph format.
  • Extended response: A written task which asks a student to present a claim and use relevant and specific evidence to develop and support their claim in an essay format.
  • Performance based assessments: Any oral or physical task where a student is required to present information or exhibit knowledge of the content to peers or an instructor.
  • Homework: Assignments that are given on a daily basis which ask students to extend their learning by completing a task at home that is relevant to their current learning in class.
  • Quizzes: Short assessments which can be a combination of multiple choice, short response or extended response questions that students are required to complete individually in class under time restrictions.
  • Cornell Notes: The daily recording of what has been learned in class by students in their binders or notebooks.


In compliance with New York State and New York City standards, all 6th, 7th and 8th graders take grade appropriate ELA and mathematics exams in April and the New York State science exam in June. Students enrolled in Regents level science classes also take the New York State Living Environment Regents in June.

Assessment Measures:
Assessments are recorded using the following aligned methods (Reference the “CCLS & IB MYP Rubric Guide”):

  • IB Achievement Levels: A quantitative scale that measures a student’s achievement level according to criteria and objectives for each content area as stated in the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program subject guide. This assessment measure is currently used for all summative and some formative assessments. The school is working towards the use of IB achievement levels for all assessments.
  • NYS Levels: A quantitative scale that measures a student’s level of mastery of Common Core State Standards from 1-4. This assessment measure is used for all summative and some formative assessments. The levels can be interpreted as follows:
    • Level 1: Below Proficient
    • Level 2: Developing
    • Level 3: Proficient

o    Level 4: Above Proficient

  • Percent Correct: A quantitative measure from 0-100. This assessment measure is used for all assessments.


Assessment Reporting:
The communication of assessment achievements is key to informing teachers, parents and administrators of next steps to aid a student’s academic growth. Percentages and New York State levels are recorded on an online grade book program called Engrade. Students and parents can monitor their student’s progress daily, and interact with teachers with features such as online messaging, behavior reports and assessment comments. Student portfolios are also required for each subject area that contains summative assessments with an assessment measure with next steps for the student.

In order to create cohesion between the three assessment measures used at Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy, the Common Core Learning Standards & International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program Rubric Handbook has been developed to align the measures.

Currently, IB achievement levels are only reported to students through rubrics used to measure their formative and summative assessments. Starting in September 2014, all students will have access to their IB levels online and be given a separate IB report card to monitor their progress throughout the program.

Language Acquisition | English Language Learner Policy
MOTT HALL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY | 2013-2014

Language Learning Mission/Vision Statement
At Mott Hall Science and Technology, we believe that:

  • Language learning promotes a student’s individuality/holistic development of cognitive, academic, emotional, and social development
  • Language is the most important medium through which students can communicate and learn
  • Language acquisition can promote bilingualism, cultural awareness, appreciation/respect of cultures and open-mindedness
  • Students should have access to an education that develops their mother-tongue and the dominant language of their environment/second language
  • Students should have access to all languages regardless of their background
  • Learning language is a dynamic and life-long process
  • Learning different languages helps individuals to learn about a culture’s religion, nuances, practices and make intra-cultural connections to their own lives
  • It is the responsibility of teachers to be aware of students’ different backgrounds and should foster a respect for these cultures and draw upon these cultures as inspiration for teaching and learning
  • In an increasingly global economy, second language acquisition and refinement of first language can provide students with greater professional and social opportunities

Language Profile of Students

The student population at our school is very diverse. The languages within our community include English, Spanish, Wolof, French, Bengali, Mandingo, Ibo and Hungarian. They range from students with limited Language Acquisition instruction, English speaking students with previous Language Acquisition instruction and bilingual students with limited or no Language Acqusition: English instruction.

Mott Hall offers Language Acquisition instruction in Spanish, Latin and English. Starting in the 2013-2014 school year, students IB MYP year 1 and 2 will receive Spanish instruction. Year 3 will receive Latin. The instructors will loop up with the students to ensure that students do not transfer between languages and have three years of language acquisition. Bilingual students are instructed according to the level of proficiency of the English language, or by phases 1-3. As mandated by the state, these students follow the transitional bilingual program (as explained as the English Language Learner Support section) and the English as a Second Language Program.


Native Language Development

The native or dominant language at Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy is English. The development of this language is fostered in all subject areas but is explicitly focused on in Language and Literature classes or English Language Arts classes.

In Language and Literature classes, students explore different genres of literature or informational texts, including biographies, feature articles, narratives, myths or poems. Through inquiry-based instruction, students use these texts to discover their different purposes and how language functions differently in each text to convey this purpose.

Verbal use of the English language is encouraged on a daily basis through class participation. Students can be seen verbally communicating in small groups, large groups or in class discussion in any given class. Socratic seminars are also geared towards developing a student’s verbal language as they are asked to confirm, extend or challenge the thoughts of others. Instructors may also include oral presentations that assess a student’s use of the English language. The use of standard English vernacular and complete thoughts is required in all verbal communication.

Written English language is an important component of native language acquisition in our school. Our students are taught grammar, spelling, organization, and voice and how to effectively develop these aspects of different types of writing. Written assessments accompanying the study of all subjects is required. There is a common expectation for students to use written English language to develop and explain a claim supported by evidence.

Vocabulary expansion is vital for a student’s knowledge of a language. Teachers use sophisticated language in the classroom and select rigorous material that exposes students to words they are unfamiliar with. Students are encouraged to use newly acquired vocabulary in their writing or verbal language.


Non-native Language Acquisition

For non-native language acquisition Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy offers two Language Acquisition course options: Latin or Spanish.

Students studying Spanish practice reading, writing, listening and speaking in the target language in activities aligned with standards at the national and state levels as well as the IB MYP standards. Students studying Latin focus on reading, translation and grammatical analysis of the target language, with composition, listening and speaking activities supporting students’ understanding of the written language.

Second language grammar, e.g. conjugation of verbs, parts of speech, etc., is an essential component of both the modern and Classical Language Acquisition courses. This ensures a deep understanding of the target language, a support for students’ knowledge of Language and Literature grammar, and an awareness of languages as logical communication systems.

Cultural awareness is also an essential component of the two Language Acquisition courses. In Spanish, students explore cultural practices such as food, interpersonal interactions, dance and dress throughout Latin America. The study of Spanish also connects Mott Hall students with our local Spanish speaking community here in the South Bronx. In Latin, students study ancient Greco-Roman culture including their architecture, art, mythology, government, history, daily life, and how these cultural products and practices influence our modern world. In this way students see how their second language knowledge supports their study of other academic disciplines, namely the arts, humanities, and language and literature.


Mother-Tongue Instruction

“Children who speak a language other than English enter U.S. schools with abilities and talents similar to those of native English-speaking children...However, unless parents and teachers actively encourage maintenance of the native language, the child is in danger of losing it and with that loss, the benefits of bilingualism. Maintaining the native language matters for the following reasons: personal...social...intellectual...educational...[and] economic.” (Intercultural Development Research Association, 2000)

Maintaining a child’s first language, while developing the second language, provides an array of benefits throughout their life.  Through instruction, Spanish speakers that are English Language Learners (ELLs ) receive opportunities for the development of literacy in their native language.  Instruction in Spanish class for Spanish-speaking ELLs is exclusively in Spanish, which allows for the flourishing of their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills.  Students learn the importance of, and apply, varying literacy skills (such as syllabic breakdown of words and accentuation rules), which develop their ability to read and write in their mother-tongue.  For beginner and recent arrival ELLs, this provides a more accessible and smooth transition into mainstream English Language Arts.  Students are exposed to different texts, resources, and media that use their first language and demonstrate different aspects and topics within their culture.  In their Language and Literature class (English Language Arts), ELLs are also supported with the use of Spanish resources and materials.


English Language Learner Support

All parents or guardians of newly enrolled students at MHSTA are required to complete a Home Language Identification Survey (HLIS), administered by a trained pedagogue. This survey lets school staff know what language is used at home. If the HLIS indicates that a child uses a language other than English, he or she is administered an English proficiency test called the Language Assessment Battery-Revised (LAB-R). Performance on this test determines the child’s entitlement to English language development support services. (If LAB-R results show that a child is an ELL and Spanish is used in the home, he or she must also take a Spanish LAB to determine language dominance.) Once language proficiency level is determined (beginner, intermediate, or advanced), students are provided with adequate English language instruction using the Milestones curriculum to develop all modalities of language: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Program placement is determined by parents/guardians’ choice between the three ELL programs offered by the NYCDOE: Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE), Freestanding English as a Second Language (ESL), and Dual Language program. MHSTA offers the first two.

 

For the 2013-14 school year, there are 418 students at MHSTA. Of that number, 83 are English Language Learners students. Mother-tongue languages represented by these students include Spanish (72), Bengali (2), Wolof (3), French (2), Mandingo (3), and Arabic (1). MHSTA supports and adheres to the principles of the New York City Department of Education CR Part 154 for Transitional Bilingual and English as a Second language Programs, outlined on the OELL website as follows:

 

  • Transitional Bilingual Education: Standards-based subject matter instruction is provided in the student’s native language with intensive support in ESL. As English proficiency increases, so does the amount of time students are taught in English. English proficiency is accelerated through ESL, ELA, and NLA development.
  • Freestanding ESL: Students in ESL are taught in English using ESL methodologies and native language support for a specific amount of time as determined by their New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test (NYSESLAT) scores.

 

At Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy ELLs are held to the same high standards and expectations as all students. Curriculum, instruction, and assessment in all classrooms serving ELLs students are aligned with New York State standards in all core areas. Literacy is developed through native language arts (NLA), English as a second language (ESL) and English language arts (ELA) curricula aligned with the ELA standards. The value of learning to read first in the native language is recognized. Instructional strategies promote the transfer of literacy skills learned in the native language to acquisition of literacy in English.

There is positive school climate for ELLs. The languages and cultures of ELLs are respected and valued throughout the school. Parents of ELLs are made to feel important members of the school community. Bilingual and ESL teachers are an integral part of the instructional staff and they are provided with the support, materials, and resources needed to be successful.

ELLs performance and services are assessed on an ongoing basis at all levels using multiple, fair, and equitable measures. Assessment is conducted in the native language and in English as appropriate. The information obtained is used to determine student academic progress, the level of English language acquisition, and to refine services to ELLs and report outcomes.

There are well­ prepared, competent, and appropriately certified teachers, administrators, and staff working with ELLs. The staff participates in ongoing, long­ term staff development with strong emphasis on the State learning standards. We ensure equity in technology and instructional resources for ELLs by providing equal access to computers, instructional technology, and materials that support native language and English language literacy development. We support ELLs academic success through after school instruction, Saturday instruction, and/or summer academies.

We adjust the grading policy for ELLs. All ELL students receive a 6-8 weeks average based on two sources:  formative and summative grades, in the same manner as all students, with the following exceptions:

  • Summative grades (periodic assessments) – will receive graduated weights depending on the English proficiency level of each student, as follows:

1.       Phase 3 (Advanced):                                            30% of total grade

2.       Phase 2 (Intermediate students):   20% of total grade

3.       Phase 1 (Beginning students):                          15% of total grade

  • Newly arrived ELLs: ELLs who have been in the country less than one academic year will receive a pass/fail grade for all classes. They must take the NYS Math exam, and NYSESLAT, but are exempt from all other exams and periodic assessments for their first academic year. Teachers can use alternative assessments such projects and presentations to assess ELLs academic progress.


Revised: 2/27/14

Special Needs Policy
MOTT HALL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY | 2013-2014

Special Needs Mission Statement

Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy strives to make all learning experiences and opportunities accessible to the diverse needs of our learning community. We are dedicated to providing a safe, welcoming, environment where students can be risk-takers, caring and principled by teaching and practicing respect and acceptance for all through the pursuit of open minded dispositions.  

We value and embrace the modifications and accommodations that lead to participation (whether full or partial) for every student; instilling the value and integrity of each and every learner in our community; that in some cases "fair doesn't mean everyone gets the same, but that they get what they need".

We believe that each student deserves a free and appropriate public education in their least restrictive environment; one which uses creative and multi-modal strategies to differentiate and meet the needs of our special education population while simultaneously providing access to a rigorous, inquiry based curriculum, accentuating strengths intellectually (knowledge/critical thinking), socially (communication), and emotionally (balanced) and offering opportunities for growth in aspects that focus on preparing our children to be reflective, contributing members of a global society.


Learning Support Protocols and Relevant Terminology

The following process is used to identify and assess students with special needs:

  • Student identified by teacher parent and or staff member based on observation from academic performance.
  • Students’ name submitted to Grade Team who performs case study to determine recommended intervention strategies to address academic challenges.
  • Grade Team reconvenes with progress report, which includes data and observations, if no progress is documented from the recommended intervention, teacher fills-out referral form.
  • Planning and Placement Team schedules meeting with parent/guardian, teachers and School Based Support Team Staff Representatives to discuss students’ educational progress.
  • Teachers bring anecdotal and academic intervention documentation to accurately address student learning needs for instructional planning.
  • Planning and Placement Team review intervention strategies and track students’ progress before referral for Special Educational or Related Services.  If student is not progressing based on academic intervention strategies the Planning and Placement Team will request a comprehensive special education evaluation upon approval from parent.

General Education

Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy provides their students a general education in a setting that ranges from least restrictive to a more restrictive environment based on the student’s academic needs as outlined in their IEP.  This includes instruction that occurs outside of the classroom such as within the school or community where interaction occurs with persons without disabilities (e.g., assemblies, field trips and community transition services).  Students of Mott Hall who require additional support receives specially designed instruction with supplementary aids and services.  This could include, but not be limited to, modifications to the regular curriculum, co-teaching (general education teacher and special education teacher team teaching in the same classroom), special education training for the general education teacher, computer assisted devices, note takers, physical arrangements of the classroom, peer supports, related services provided in the general education setting, grading modifications, and/or classroom or individual aides.

                                                                                                                   

Special Education

Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy Special Class Services serve students with disabilities whose needs cannot be met within the general education class.           The special education teacher is responsible for designing and delivering instruction.  The students may also require additional support including, but not limited to, related services, adapted physical education, assistive technology and travel training.  Further, assistance may be provided in areas such as modifying curricular content, identifying and selecting instructional materials and developing assessment materials. Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy students in special classes will have access to all the general education programs. Paraprofessionals may also help by providing additional support in the classroom.

 

Related Services:

Speech and Language Therapy: Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy students receive services from a Speech/Language Therapist.  The services are for students with a communication problem, including problems of language comprehension and expressive language, which adversely affect school performance.  In addition, it may be recommended for students with speech production skills whose speech is unintelligible or not commensurate with the student's total profile, including cognitive development that adversely affects his or her educational performance.

 

Occupational Therapy: Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy students receive services from an Occupational Therapy whose emphasizes independence in activities of daily living (e.g. dressing, feeding, money management), skill acquisition (e.g. self-management skills, vocational skills) and school participation in various settings including the classroom, cafeteria, bathroom, and playground. Occupational Therapy is designed to maintain, improve or restore function of students in all educationally related activities including neuro-musculoskeletal function (e.g. range of motion, muscle strength, endurance, postural control), motor function (e.g. fine motor skills, oral motor control, visual motor integration), sensory and perceptual function (e.g. integrating and processing of tactile, visual, auditory information), cognitive function (e.g. attention, memory) and psychosocial function (e.g. self-concept, interpersonal skills).

 

Counseling: The purpose of counseling for Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy students with disabilities is to help them recognize and modify behaviors that interfere with their learning. The type of counseling (individual and/or group) along with the IEP goals and objectives, frequency, and duration are determined by the IEP Team in collaboration with parents/guardians, and general and special education teachers.  The counseling services are designed to improve students' social and emotional school functioning in the areas of appropriate school behavior and discipline, social skills, self-control, conflict resolution, problem solving skills, self-esteem, decision-making skills and vocational and transition planning.

 

Hearing Education Services: Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy students receive services to promote achievement for students with hearing loss by ensuring equal access to instruction through academic services as outlined in their IEP or 504 Plan, by providing information and education about each individual’s hearing loss and communication needs, and by collaborating with general educators and other stakeholders to promote student success. Our Hearing Education Services are designed to provide intensive instruction in speech reading, auditory training and language development to enhance the growth of receptive/expressive communication skills.

 

Health Services: Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy Student’s receive School Health Services to address the specific health needs of the student and to ensure a safe educational environment that allows the student to benefit from his/her primary educational program. School Health Services are also designed to enhance the student's ability to access the least restrictive environment and participate to his/her full potential within it. School Health Services may be provided by a professional registered nurse or a paraprofessional. The nature of the health services determines whether they are provided by a nurse or a paraprofessional upon approval from the parent,

 

Special Education Teacher Support Services (SETSS): Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy Special Class Services serve students with disabilities whose needs cannot be met within the general education class.  The special education teacher is responsible for designing and delivering instruction.  The students may also require additional support including, but not limited to, related services, adapted physical education, assistive technology and travel training.  Further, assistance may be provided in areas such as modifying curricular content, identifying and selecting instructional materials and developing assessment materials. Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy students in special classes will have access to all the general education programs. Paraprofessionals may also help by providing additional support in the classroom.


Direct Instruction: The special education teacher of Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy may work directly with a student (or work with a group of no more than 8 student) and provide direct services specially designed and/or supplemental instruction to the student. The special education teacher may adapt the subject matter (“modified curriculum”) and/ or use visual aids, highlighted work sheets, simplified directions, and other kinds of “modified instruction” to meet the educational needs of the student.

 

Indirect Instruction: The special education teacher of Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy may also work with the students’ general education teacher to modify and adapt instructional techniques and methods to meet the individual needs of the student. Students who receive SETSS receive up to 3 hours per week of modified instruction by on his/her IEP recommended services.

 

ICT/CTT- Mott Hall Science and Technology Academy Integrated Co-Teaching (ICT) classrooms include students with and without disabilities.  Our ICT classrooms have two teachers, a general education teacher and a special education teacher.  The teachers collaborate to adapt and modify instruction ensuring that students master specific skills and concepts in the general education curriculum, as well as safeguarding that their special education needs are being met, including meeting alternate curriculum goals.

12:1:1 (Self-Contained)- Mott Hall Science and Academy students who are in Self-Contained classes based on their IEP classification are provided with a general education curriculum in a more restricted environment to meet their educational needs.  The special education teacher is responsible for designing and delivering instruction in special classes. There is a paraprofessional who also provides support in the classroom. Students in self-contained classes may also require additional supports including, but not limited to, related services, adapted physical education, assistive technology and travel training.
•             Special Class Staffing Ratio 12:1:1
•             No more than twelve (12) students per class
•             One full-time paraprofessional

Special Needs Population Data
GRADE SIX:

6th Grade Classified Special Education Students

6th Grade Special Education  Student

Classifications Compared to Total 6th Grade Population

6th Grade Student Classifications Compared to Total 6th Grade Special Education Population

Students with Related Services in the Special Education Population

Educational Program Type in the Special Education Population

24%

 

(classified students / total students)

LD: 10.4%

SLI: 6.4%

OHI: 4%

ED: 2.4%

HI: .8%

LD: 43%

SLI: 27%

OHI:17%

ED: 10%

HI: 3%

SLT: 33%

C: 43%

HS: 0%

HES: 3%

OT: 13%

ICT: 23%

12:1:1: 27%

GE: 50%




GRADE SEVEN:

7th Grade Classified Special Education Students

7th Grade Special Education Student

Classifications Compared to Total 7th Grade Population

7th Grade Student Classifications Compared to Total 7th Grade Special Education Population

Students with Related Services in the Special Education Population

Educational Program Type in the Special Education Population

16%

(21 classified students /134 total students)

LD: 7%

SLI: 4%

OHI: 2%

ED: .7%

HI: .7%

LD: 48%

SLI: 5%

OHI: 14%

ED: 5%

HI: 5%

SLT: 29%

C: 57%

HS: 5%

HES: 5%

OT: 5%

ICT: 0%

12:1:1: 33%

GE: 67%


GRADE EIGHT:

8th Grade Classified Special Education Students

8th Grade Special Education Student

Classifications Compared to Total 8th Grade Population

8th Grade Student Classifications Compared to Total 8th Grade Special Education Population

Students with Related Services in the Special Education Population

Educational Program Type in the Special Education Population

20.6%

(26 classified students /126 total students)

LD: 15.9%

SLI: .02%

OHI: .02%

ED: .02%

HI: .01 %

LD:76.9%

SLI: .08%

OHI: .08%

ED:  .08%

HI: .04 %

SLT: 23.1%

C: 30.8%

HS: 0%

HES: 0%

OT: 0%

ICT: 0%

12:1:1: 47%

GE: 53%



IB Special Education – Testing Accommodations/Modifications

                All Special Education students have a page on their Individualized Education Plan (IEP) specifying their appropriate learning accommodations and modifications.  The New York City Department of Education defines an accommodation as “a service or support that is provided to help a student fully access the subject matter and instruction”. (www.http://schools.nyc.gov) Accommodations are changes to the setting, instructional delivery or educational materials used during the lesson.  Accommodations do not change the skill or content of what is being taught. For local and state testing, most IEP students have an accommodation of extended time. These students have more time than the general education population has to complete the same assessment. For example, if a class is having thirty minutes to complete a quiz, IEP students would have forty-five minutes if they have time and a half or one hour if they have double time. These accommodations provide Special Education students with the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of a skill.  The New York City Department of Education defines a modification as “a change in the curriculum or measurement of learning, and may be appropriate when a student with a disability is unable to comprehend all of the core content” (www.http://schools.nyc.gov).  Modifications can change the way content is presented to the student, the way the student is to respond to a question, or the process the student uses to obtain an answer. For local and state assessments the most commonly used modifications are testing in a separate location with directions read aloud. Testing accommodations and modifications should not be providing students with disabilities with an unfair advantage over the general education students.

 

The following accommodations and modifications are commonly used to assist the IEP students at Mott Hall Science & Technology Academy:

 

  • Assistive Technology Devices – IDEA defines AT as “any item, piece of equipment or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve the functional capabilities of a child with a disability." (www.http://schools.nyc.gov) These students also receive support services to learn how to use the assistive technology.
  • Behavior Intervention Plan
  • Teaching Assistant/Teacher aide
  • Graphic organizers
  • Large font texts or Braille
  • Note taker/scribe
  • Additional time to complete class assignments and assessments
  • Modified promotion criteria
  • Separate location
  • Small setting to complete assessments (double time and time and 1/2)


Last Revised: 9/27/2013

Electronic Device Return Policy

MOTT HALL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY | 2013-2014

            Parents, guardians and family members should be aware that electronic devices are prohibited on school property. Below are the procedures to be followed, if a student’s phone is seen or heard on school premises:

       If the electronic device is visible, the staff member or administrator that sees the phone will confiscate it and submit it to the Dean of Student Affairs.

       If the electronic device is heard, the staff member or administrator that hears the phone will confiscate it and submit it to the Dean of Student Affairs.

       Staff and administration reserve the right to request that students reveal their electronic device if it is heard on school premises.

       The Dean of Student Affairs will notify the parent and/or guardian of the child that the electronic device has been confiscated, and will give them a date 7 school days from the turn-in date for the parent and/or guardian to pick up the electronic device.

       All confiscated electronic device will only be returned to the parent/guardian of the student after 7 school days.

       If there is a second offense, the electronic device will only be returned to the parent/guardian of the student after 14 school days.

       If there is a third offense, the electronic device will not be returned to the parent/guardian of the student until the end of the school year

 

As stated in the Regulation of the Chancellor, A-412:

D. Cell phones, ipods, beepers and other communication devices are prohibited on school property. However, a principal may grant permission for a student to bring a cell phone into a school building for medical reasons.

E. If the school confiscates a cell phone, ipod, beeper or other communication device, the principal/designee must immediately contact the student’s parent and arrange for the parent to appear in person to pick up the device.

F. The cell phone, ipod, beeper or other communication device should be maintained and secured by the school until the parent appears. If the parent repeatedly fails to appear to pick it up, the school should dispose of the item.

 

For more information, you can read the full document at:

http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/44A34025-2D84-4494-B34C-2F567CC9FA4F/0/A412SecurityintheSchoolsCellPhoneAmendedVersion11806.pdf

 

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